Homemade hibachi | foodsciencenerd.com

Homemade Hibachi

Posted on Posted in Nutrition Information, Recipes

A few months ago, I started working out like I did when I danced, like, a million hours a week.  I didn’t really make any changes to my diet to accommodate because I figured it wasn’t a big enough lifestyle change, but I was wrong.  About a month in, I constantly felt lightheaded, my nails were breaking, my skin and hair were really dry, and I was way more pale than usual (which is really saying something).  I chalked it up to this miserable winter until I had cravings for steak and pork- two foods I rarely eat and never keep in the house- for about 3 days straight.  Pieces started falling in line, and I realized I may be reverting to the anemia that I had as a child.  So, I went about finding ways to add more iron-rich foods to my diet without going overboard on the saturated fat.  I decided on a cheap, lean cut of beef to purchase- flank steak.  It can be tough, so it should be cooked rapidly on high heat, for applications such as fajitas… or stir fry!  Here’s what I did:

Prepare some sticky brown rice.  I tossed mine in a pan after it was done with a touch of soy sauce to get it a little crispy (like at a Japanese steakhouse), but that’s unnecessary.

Cut up a lot of squash, zucchini, mushrooms, and onion.

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Heat some oil (or butter, if you’re feeling indulgent) in a large pan (cast iron is best) over high heat, and sear a well-seasoned flank steak on each side for about 3 minutes, or until about half-done, depending on the thickness.  I used pepper, onion salt, and soy sauce as seasoning.

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Heat more oil to searing hot in the same pan and toss in the onion.  Fry until brown and slightly soft.

Toss in the rest of the vegetables, seasonings of your choice, and saute until brown on all sides and softened.  I used pepper and soy sauce as seasonings again.

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While the veggies are sauteing, slice the steak as thin as possible against the grain.  When the vegetables are almost done, toss in the steak to finish cooking.

Serve on top of the rice:

Homemade hibachi | foodsciencenerd.com
It’s not pretty, but it’s delicious!

I made way too many vegetables, so for a few days I reheated the vegetables and made some chicken the same way I made the steak for protein.  Unfortunately, the veggies don’t actually keep all that well for leftovers, so maybe just make enough to serve for one night.

This meal is perfectly balance vegetables, protein, and whole grains.  It is very high in salt, so if you are concerned about sodium, add less soy sauce and try to find reduced-sodium soy sauce instead.  In fact, I think that’s all I had in the house, and this turned out just fine.  As an added bonus, using a cast iron pan leaches iron into the food (a very small amount, though), so between the meat and the pan, you get a double dose of iron!

Homemade Hibachi

Yield: 4 servings

Homemade Hibachi

Ingredients

  • 2 medium zucchinis or squashes
  • 8 oz mushrooms
  • 1 medium onion
  • 2 Tbsp butter or oil, divided
  • 1 1/2 lb flank steak or chicken breast
  • Pepper and soy sauce to taste

Directions

  1. Cut up squash, zucchini, mushrooms, and onion.
  2. Heat some oil (or butter, if you're feeling indulgent) in a large pan (cast iron is best) over high heat, and sear a well-seasoned flank steak on each side for about 3 minutes, or until medium-rare, depending on the thickness.
  3. Heat more oil to searing hot in the same pan and toss in the onion. Fry until brown and slightly soft.
  4. Toss in the rest of the vegetables, seasonings of your choice, and saute until brown on all sides and softened.
  5. While the veggies are sauteing, slice the steak as thin as possible against the grain. When the vegetables are almost done, toss in the steak to finish cooking.
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